MOEDAS E NOTAS DE PORTUGAL

COINS AND PAPER MONEY FROM PORTUGAL AND EX-COLONIES

PORTUGAL E COLONIAS MOEDAS E NOTAS

PORTUGUESE COINS AND PAPER MONEY FOR SALE

COINS GRADING SYSTEM


Many Coin Grading Systems have been tried over the years.  The current method of numismatic coin grading has proved to be key, and is accepted worldwide.  It was developed by Dr. William H. Sheldon and is based on a 70 point numeric scale.  The lowest gradable coin is one that enables you to distinguish the type of coin and the date.  This is given a grade of 1.  Sheldon came up with numerical grades of 7 to 10 for Very Good, 12 to 15 for Fine, 20 to 30 for Very Fine, 40 for Extremely Fine, 50 for About Uncirculated, and 60 to 70 for Mint State.  These are the Coin Grading System books use to determine the value of gold bullion coins and rare coins.


The ANA (American Numismatic Association) adopted it right away and the PCGS (Professional Coin Grading System) has used the 1-70 coin grading system scale since they began in 1986.  This coin grading system is widely accepted among both collectors and dealers, worldwide.  It has become habit to send coins to grading services.  PCGS, ICG, and NGC are the industry leaders in third party grading services.  The coins are graded and then sealed in a tamper apparent "slab".  Thus the grade of that particular coin is determined beyond doubt.  Standard, or 'unslabbed' coins are referred to as "raw" coins.  While coin investors look for slabbed coins, most pure collectors still prefer raw coins to slabbed.  This means you need to
be familiar with coin grading system, or coins you are considering acquiring.  The complete, official coin grading system is listed below.

Poor
PO-1
Identifiable date and type
Fair
FR-2
Mostly worn, though some detail is visible
About Good
AG-3
Worn rims but most lettering is readable though worn
Good
G-4
Slightly worn rims, flat detail, peripheral lettering nearly full
Good
G-6
Rims complete with flat detail, peripheral lettering full
Very Good
VG-8
Design worn with slight detail
Very Good
VG-10
Design worn with slight detail, slightly clearer
Fine
F-12
Some deeply recessed areas with detail, all lettering sharp
Fine
F-15
Slightly more detail in the recessed areas, all lettering sharp
Very Fine
VF-20
Some definition of detail, all lettering full and sharp
Very Fine
VF-25
Slightly more definition in the detail and lettering
Very Fine
VF-30
Almost complete detail with flat areas
Very Fine
VF-35
Detail is complete but worn with high points flat
Extra Fine
EF-40
Detail is complete with most high points slightly flat
Extra Fine
EF-45
Detail is complete with some high points flat
Almost Uncirculated
AU-50
Full detail with friction over most of the surface, slight flatness on high points
Almost Uncirculated
AU-53
Full detail with friction over 1/2 or more of surface, very slight flatness on high points
Almost Uncirculated
AU-55
Full detail with friction on less than 1/z surface, mainly on high points
Almost Uncirculated
AU-58
Full detail with only slight friction on the high points
Mint/Proof State
MS/PR-60
No wear. May have many heavy marks/hairlines, strike may not be full
Mint/Proof State
MS/PR-61
No wear. Multiple heavy marks/hairlines, strike may not be full
Mint/Proof State
MS/PR-62
No wear. Slightly less marks/hairlines, strike may not be full
Mint/Proof State
MS/PR-63
Moderate number/size marks/hairlines, strike may not be full
Mint/Proof State
MS/PR-64
Few marks/hairlines or a couple of severe ones, strike should be average or above
Mint/Proof State
MS/PR-65
Minor marks/hairlines though none in focal areas, above average strike
Mint/Proof State
MS/PR-66
Few minor marks/hairlines not in focal areas, good strike
Mint/Proof State
MS/PR-67
Virtually as struck with minor imperfections, very well struck
Mint/Proof State
MS/PR-68
Virtually as struck with slight imperfections, slightest weakness of strike allowed
Mint/Proof State
MS/PR-69
Virtually as struck with minuscule imperfections, near full strike necessary
Mint/Proof State
MS/PR-70
As struck, with full strike


In the past, coin collecting has been made tricky by a very subjective coin grading system.  Reminder- Coin Grading System is the process of determining the condition of any type of coin. 

What are the factors that determine the value of a coin?

The first is rarity, how many of the coins were produced and still survive.  The second is popularity or demand.  Even if a coin is produced in relatively small quantities, if there is no demand for it, the price will reflect that lack of demand.  The third, and easily the most important, is the condition or grade of the coin.

There are two types of coins minted.  Those designed as high gloss examples are called Proofs.  These are designed as samples, gifts or collectibles.  They are not designed to be spent.  The other type is called a "business strike".  These coins are designed for circulation.  This circulation wears the coin down.  The better the condition, the greater the Coin Grading System value.  Some coins wear better, or were struck better than others.  Some materials last longer than others.